Wednesday, 27 July 2016

Haida Gwaii

I have recently returned from visiting Haida Gwaii. We drove to Prince Rupert and took the 7 hour ferry ride across Hecate Strait to Skitigate. Here is some background on Haida Gwaii:


"Haida Gwaii (/ˈhdə ɡw/ HY-də-GWY; Haida: X̱aayda gwaay;[2] literally "Islands of the Haida people"),[3] formerly known as the Queen Charlotte Islands[4] and the Charlottes, is an archipelago on the North Coast of British Columbia, Canada. Approximately half of its population is of the Haida people.[5]

The islands are separated from the British Columbia mainland to the east by Hecate Strait. Vancouver Island lies to the south, across Queen Charlotte Sound, while the U.S. state of Alaska is to the north, across the disputed Dixon Entrance.

Haida Gwaii consists of two main islands: Graham Island in the north and Moresby Island in the south, along with approximately 150 smaller islands with a total landmass of 10,180 km2 (3,931 sq mi). Other major islands include Anthony, Langara, Louise, Lyell, Burnaby, and Kunghit Islands. A parallel name to "Queen Charlotte Islands" used by American traders, who frequented the islands in the days of the marine fur trade and considered the islands part of the US-claimed Oregon Country, was Washington's Isles.[4][6][7]

Some of the islands are protected under federal legislation as Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve and Haida Heritage Site, which is mostly Moresby Island (Gwaii Haanas in Haida) and adjoining islands and islets. Also protected, but under provincial legislation, are several provincial parks, the largest of which is Naikoon Provincial Park on northeastern Graham Island. The islands are home to an abundance of wildlife, including the largest subspecies of black bear, and also the smallest subspecies (Ursus americanus carlottae) and the subspecies of stoat Mustela erminea haidarum. Black-tailed deer and raccoon are introduced species that have become abundant.

On June 3, 2010, the Haida Gwaii Reconciliation Act officially renamed the islands Haida Gwaii as part of a reconciliation protocol between British Columbia and the Haida people." Wikipedia


It was my first visit, but I suspect I will return. I took 2500 pictures, I will share only a few today.

We spent most of our time on Graham Island near Tlell.

It is a green paradise....

 





 
 
...and a beachcombers delight.


 
 
 
here are few of the rocks I collected. Some of these rocks are layered mudstone and from the side resemble licorice allsorts.
 
I will share some shells in future posts.
 
 
Birds and berries.


 
We went on a few hikes, this one to the Pesuta.
 
  
 


 
 
 
Here is an "American Gothic" picture of my sister and me.
 

Forest creatures, an elephant? (spotted near Tow Hill)

 
A Haida canoe outside the museum in Skidigate.
 
 
Nootka  rose

 
Fresh chanterelles we collected.


 Fresh thimbleberry and salmonberry scones:
Yes homemade.



 
Haida Gwaii, a beautiful place and  justifiably proud people.
 
 
 
 
 


 -------------------------------------------------
 
Art news:
 
I received a third place award at the Arts 2016 show for my painting Venetian White. The exhibit continues until August 27, 2016 at the Surrey Art Gallery.

Here is the last painting I completed before my trip, a varnished watercolour named "Heart of Gold":



 
 Well that is all for today,

happy Wednesday, with whimsy,

Gillian.
 

 

Wednesday, 22 June 2016

What's new at the MOA?

What's new at the MOA - quite a lot!

If you haven't been to the Museum of Anthropology recently, now is a good time.

One of the featured exhibits is by Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun: (continues until mid October 2016)


Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun: Unceded Territories

"Vancouver artist Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun, of Coast Salish and Okanagan descent, is showcased in this provocative exhibition of works that confront the colonialist suppression of First Nations peoples and the ongoing struggle for Indigenous rights to lands, resources, and sovereignty.

Twenty years since his last major Canadian solo show, Unceded Territories will demonstrate the progression of Yuxweluptun’s artistry and ideas through hard-hitting, polemical, but also playful artworks that span his remarkable 30- year career, featuring a selection of brand-new works exhibited publicly for the first time." http://moa.ubc.ca/portfolio_page/lawrence-paul/

This is an interesting and thought provoking exhibition. Here are a few pictures I took when I visited the exhibition recently:

 
This is a painting about fish farmers, if you look carefully you can see the lice.
 
 
The shows opening attracted a record crowd:

"Red Man watching White Man trying to fix a hole in the sky"

detail of above



Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun, graduated from the Emily Carr School of Art and Design in 1983 with an honours degree in painting. Yuxweluptun's strategy is to document and promote change in contemporary Indigenous history in large-scale paintings (from 54.2 x 34.7cm to 233.7 x 200.7cm), using Coast Salish cosmology, Northwest Coast formal design elements, and the Western landscape tradition. His painted works explore political, environmental, and cultural issues. His personal and socio-political experiences enhance this practice of documentation. Yuxweluptun's work has been included in numerous international group and solo exhibitions, such as INDIGENA: Contemporary Native Perspectives in 1992. He was the recipient of the Vancouver Institute for the Visual Arts (VIVA) award in 1998. http://lawrencepaulyuxweluptun.com/


 

 
 


Here is a video titled "Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun: Unceded Territories"




The museum  has been renovated since the last time I visited, with changes to the indoor and outdoor displays. Definitely worth a visit!
 
------------------------------------------------
 
On a different level entirely here is my art news:
 
I am very please to report that my painting "Venetian White" has been accepted into the juried show "Arts 2016" and I will be getting an award.
 
 
 
The opening reception is Friday June 24, 7 to 9 pm.
 
The exhibition is at the Surrey Art Gallery (13750 88th Avenue) and runs until August 27, 2016.
 
----------------------------------------------
 
Here is my latest painting, another varnished watercolour (8" x 8") named
"Small Change":
 
 

Well that's all for this week,
 
happy Wednesday, with whimsy,
 
Gillian.






What's new at the MOA?

What's new at the MOA - quite a lot!

If you haven't been to the Museum of Anthropology recently, now is a good time.

One of the featured exhibits is by Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun: (continues until mid October 2016)


Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun: Unceded Territories

"Vancouver artist Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun, of Coast Salish and Okanagan descent, is showcased in this provocative exhibition of works that confront the colonialist suppression of First Nations peoples and the ongoing struggle for Indigenous rights to lands, resources, and sovereignty.

Twenty years since his last major Canadian solo show, Unceded Territories will demonstrate the progression of Yuxweluptun’s artistry and ideas through hard-hitting, polemical, but also playful artworks that span his remarkable 30- year career, featuring a selection of brand-new works exhibited publicly for the first time." http://moa.ubc.ca/portfolio_page/lawrence-paul/

This is an interesting and thought provoking exhibition. Here are a few pictures I took when I visited the exhibition recently:

 
This is a painting about fish farmers, if you look carefully you can see the lice.
 
 
The shows opening attracted a record crowd:

"Red Man watching White Man trying to fix a hole in the sky"

detail of above



Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun, graduated from the Emily Carr School of Art and Design in 1983 with an honours degree in painting. Yuxweluptun's strategy is to document and promote change in contemporary Indigenous history in large-scale paintings (from 54.2 x 34.7cm to 233.7 x 200.7cm), using Coast Salish cosmology, Northwest Coast formal design elements, and the Western landscape tradition. His painted works explore political, environmental, and cultural issues. His personal and socio-political experiences enhance this practice of documentation. Yuxweluptun's work has been included in numerous international group and solo exhibitions, such as INDIGENA: Contemporary Native Perspectives in 1992. He was the recipient of the Vancouver Institute for the Visual Arts (VIVA) award in 1998. http://lawrencepaulyuxweluptun.com/


 

 
 


Here is a video titled "Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun: Unceded Territories"




The museum  has been renovated since the last time I visited, with changes to the indoor and outdoor displays. Definitely worth a visit!
 
------------------------------------------------
 
On a different level entirely here is my art news:
 
I am very please to report that my painting "Venetian White" has been accepted into the juried show "Arts 2016" and I will be getting an award.
 
 
 
The opening reception is Friday June 24, 7 to 9 pm.
 
The exhibition is at the Surrey Art Gallery (13750 88th Avenue) and runs until August 27, 2016.
 
----------------------------------------------
 
Here is my latest painting, another varnished watercolour (8" x 8") named
"Small Change":
 
 

Well that's all for this week,
 
happy Wednesday, with whimsy,
 
Gillian.






Wednesday, 1 June 2016

Come along on a Riverboat?

I recently visited Whitehorse and learned the story of the steam powered sternwheelers. The SS Klondike II is now high and dry on the banks of the Yukon River and is a National Historic site.

The British Yukon Navigation company owned two steam powered sternwheelers. The Klondike I was launched in 1921 and was in service until it ran aground in 1936. The Klondike II was launched in 1937 and was in service until 1955, it is now a museum ship.


Klondike II Sternwheeler:

Length:     64 m (210 ft)
Beam:      12.5 (41 feet)
Draught:  .6 m (24 in) light and 1 m (39 in) loaded

Power:        2 compound jet condenser steam engines 525 hp
Propulsion: Stern paddle wheeler
capacity:     270 tonnes
Crew:         23


"SS Klondike was the name of two sternwheelers, the second now a national historic site located in Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada. Both ran freight between Whitehorse and Dawson City along the Yukon River from 1921-1936 and 1937-1950, respectively.
Klondike I was built in 1921 and had the distinction of having 50% more capacity than a regular sternwheeler, while still having the shallow draft and meeting the size requirements in order to travel down the Yukon River. Klondike I had a cargo capacity of 270 metric tonnes without having to push a barge.
Klondike I ran aground in June 1936 in 'The Thirty Mile' section of the Yukon River (at
 WikiMiniAtlas
61°40′17″N 134°52′22″W / 61.6713°N 134.8728°W / 61.6713; -134.8728). The British-Yukon Navigation Company (a subsidiary of the White Pass and Yukon Route railway company) salvaged much of the ship and cannibalized the wreckage to build Klondike II the following year.

Klondike II carried freight until 1950. Due to the construction of a highway connecting Dawson City and Whitehorse, many sternwheelers were decommissioned. In an attempt to save Klondike II, she was converted into a cruise ship. The venture shut down in 1955 due to lack of interest, and Klondike II was beached in the Whitehorse shipyards.
The ship was donated to Parks Canada and was gradually restored until 1966, when city authorities agreed to move the ship to its present location, then part of a squatter's residence. The task required three bulldozers, eight tons of Palmolive soap, a crew of twelve men, and three weeks to complete. Greased log rollers eased the process.
On 24 June 1967, Klondike II was designated a National Historic Site of Canada,[1] and she is now open during the summer as a tourist attraction." Wikipedia
 
 

So let's start our tour. The Sternwheelers travelled on the Yukon River between Whitehorse and Dawson City when the river was free of ice. The ships ran up and down the river carrying freight and passengers. At the end of the season the ships were brought up on the banks of the river to keep them safe for the winter.
 
 


 
Notice the twin rudders:


 
The steam power system was a contained system, reusing the same water. If the river water had been used the system would have silted up and stopped working in a short time.
 
Along the river bank were piles of lumber and the ships stopped to stock up several times during the 36 hour journey to Dawson City.
 

 
The bridge on the ship was built far enough forward on the ship to give the captain a good view of the river which had some very treacherous stretches. The silt in the river was constantly shifting and the crew had to be alert for sandbars to prevent running aground.
 
The bridge of the ship communicated with the engine room with the this device:
 



The hold was full of wood, equipment and provisions.
 
I was fascinated with the old cartons: canned fruit, shredded wheat and milk, what more could anyone want?
 
 



 
The Klondike also carried some passengers, here is a look at the first class area:
 
 
...and a warning:
 
 
 
Here is a view through the kitchen into the passenger dining room.


 
 
One of the fire stations on deck:


 
 
The trip from Whitehorse from Dawson City took 36 hours, during which the crew got very little rest so they took time in Dawson City to recuperate before the journey back. 
 
I hope you have enjoyed hitching a ride on my tour today.
 
 
---------------------------------------------------
 
So what has been happening in my studio this week?
 
Well I did not finish the painting I gave you a peek of last week, but I did finish this:
 
I call this "Showing a bit of Mussel". It is an ink and watercolour work that I have mounted on a cradle board (like a wooden box with open back) and then varnished; I still have to paint the edges of the box (1 inch deep) in dark blue acrylic paint.
 
Another first for me and again I learned a few valuable lessons from the experience.
 
------------------------------------------
 
My art news:
 
I have two paintings in the juried show "Oil and Water" at Studio 1710 ( the home of the South Delta Artists Guild).
 
The show runs from June 2 to June 25 and the opening reception is on Thursday June 2 starting at 6:30 pm.
 
 

 
 
 



--------------------------------------------------

 
Amazing sculpture with paper:


Paper art sculpture by Calvin Nicholls:

 
 
That is all for this week,
 
wishing you a happy Wednesday, with whimsy,
 
Gillian
 
Thanks for the feedback, I thrive on it.